unExpEctEd ConSequences. Not SmokinG is Good for you???

Here is a forum for those among us whose mind is cluttered with factoids that border on useless information. It is a place to obtain such information for future reference.

unExpEctEd ConSequences. Not SmokinG is Good for you???

Postby MargeC » Sat Jun 23, 2007 6:12 am

pretty weird this!


http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/6664871.stm


Like most things in life, when the smoking ban comes in force in England on 1 July, it will have unintended consequences. So who and what are the unexpected winners and losers?
The law of unintended consequences is always at work, in every area of daily life. The results can be good, bad and just plain odd.


COUNTDOWN TO LIGHTS OUT

On 1 July, smoking in enclosed public places will be banned across the UK
Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales already have such a ban; England's ban starts 1 July
The Magazine will count down the weeks with a series of articles about the impact of the ban on life in Britain


Countdown to the ban
Put simply, the actions of people - and organisations - always have effects that aren't anticipated. The subject fascinates academics and countless books have been written about it.

The law governs our lives and nowhere are the effects more pronounced than in government, where often the consequences can prove more powerful than the legislation they are a result of.

Nothing in life is exempt, so what are the unintended consequences of the smoking ban?



CAUSING PEOPLE TO TAKE UP SMOKING
You're down the pub, all your mates have nipped out for a cigarette, you don't smoke but don't want to sit on your own - what do you do? Join them. For some, standing outside while mates smoke has resulted in them taking up the habit.

"If the smoking ban in Scotland had not been introduced I would still be a non-smoker," says Andy Hughes of Edinburgh, where the ban came into force in March last year. "I started because I was being left in pubs and clubs alone for long periods of time, while the rest of my group were outside chatting and having a smoke.


MAGAZINE'S QUITTERS' PANEL



Four smokers planning to kick the habit by 1 July
"I put up with it for a few weeks but in the end I decided to join them. Being an asthmatic, I had always been against smoking. I never used to let anyone smoke in my car or house. When someone smoked in my company in a pub, I couldn't wait until they had finished their cigarette. It was still something I had a real dislike of and a habit I considered to be disgusting.

"Now I'll regularly smoke up to 20 cigarettes on a night out. I still don't smoke when not out having a drink and I hope it stays that way. There's no doubt a lot of good has come from the smoking ban, it's a lot more pleasurable having a drink in a smoke-free atmosphere and I'm sure healthier for bar staff and non-smokers, but for myself it has come at a price."


CHILDREN PASSIVE SMOKING
If you can't smoke at the pub and you don't want a fag standing outside, where are you going to light up? At home? The jury is still out as to whether the ban will result in children being expose to more passive smoking at home, but one study of the US suggests it could be the case.

Economists at University College London studied the direct effect on passive smoking from different kinds of bans. They concluded parents smoke more at home if they can't in bars or restaurants. Other bans, such as those on trains, shopping areas, or workplaces, do not appear to result in children being exposed to more harmful fumes at home.

Opponents of the ban are quick to jump on the argument, while ASH Scotland - a voluntary organisation campaigning for effective tobacco control legislation - says there is no published, peer-reviewed evidence to support the argument.

Edinburgh University is now undertaking research on the issue, which will published later in the year. Every year more than 17,000 children under the age of five are admitted to hospital in Britain suffering from illnesses related to passive smoking, according to the Royal College of Physicians.



INCREASING GLOBAL WARMING
With punters who smoke being forced outside for a fag, pubs are keen to make them as comfortable as possible so they go back in and spend more money. Thousands are being spent by breweries on outdoor smoking areas.


Outdoor heaters have been criticised
Keeping the chill off smokers is high up the list of priorities, putting outdoor heaters on the shopping list. The introduction of the smoking ban in England is expected to trigger a huge increase in demand for heat umbrellas, potentially creating a new environmental burden.

Using a gas-fired heater for just one hour can waste enough energy to make 400 cups of tea, according to Friends of the Earth. Increased demand due to the smoking ban has prompted concern about exacerbating global warming. The Lib Dem environment spokesman, Norman Baker, has urged the government to act over the "wasteful practice" of patio heaters ahead of the ban.

Environmental groups say the heaters are energy-hungry and their advice is simple - if it's cold outside, wear a coat. But manufacturers say figures for how much carbon heaters emit are often inaccurate and misleading. Based on government statistics, they say the current number of heaters are responsible for 0.002% of all UK carbon emissions.



MAKING CHEFS THE NEW PLUMBERS
Recently the shortage of plumbers sent their wages sky high, prompting others to ditch well-paid jobs elsewhere to learn the trade and cash in. Now - thanks to the smoking ban - it's chefs.

Beer and fags go hand in hand for many and a lot of heavy smokers are also heavy drinkers. In a bid to offset the possible impact on alcohol sales of punters being turned outside for a cigarette, many pubs are focusing on food. It's resulted in the demand for chefs going through the roof and their wages could follow.

Jobs website Gumtree.com has seen a 37% increase in the number of adverts posted by pubs looking for chefs since the smoking ban in England was announced last December. It's a 114% increase compared with the same period last year, and demand is expected to keep on rising.

"The increased focus on food in the run-up to the smoking ban means trained chefs are very much in demand," says John Porter, food editor of trade newspaper The Publican. "But demand totally outstrips supply, as there is a real skills shortage in the industry. Pubs are having to really improve the wages and benefits they offer in order to fill vacancies."

Last year the average wage for a chef at a standard pub was under £25,000, now it's estimated to top £30,000 plus bonuses. Some companies are luring chefs from Michelin-starred restaurants with six-figure salaries to up their game when it comes to pub grub.


LINING THE POCKETS OF THE PAPARAZZI

The smoking ban is very democratic, even the rich and famous are forced outside for a fag and guess who's waiting for them - the paparazzi.


Looking forward to the ban
Within weeks of a smoking ban being introduced in New York, stars such as Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Hudson were pictured outside restaurants and bars having a puff.

Such establishments used to be able to shield their famous patrons from the camera lens, but it will be much harder with smoking bans.

Celebrities now face a choice, forego the fag or stand a good chance of being snapped having it. What's the solution? Exclusive outdoor smoking lounges for VIPs perhaps?
Bad Seed
User avatar
MargeC
Frantic
 
Posts: 475
Joined: Sun Jul 02, 2006 6:41 pm
Location: somewhere else

Postby Sandra » Sat Jun 23, 2007 10:31 am

CAUSING PEOPLE TO TAKE UP SMOKING
You're down the pub, all your mates have nipped out for a cigarette, you don't smoke but don't want to sit on your own - what do you do? Join them. For some, standing outside while mates smoke has resulted in them taking up the habit.

"If the smoking ban in Scotland had not been introduced I would still be a non-smoker," says Andy Hughes of Edinburgh, where the ban came into force in March last year. "I started because I was being left in pubs and clubs alone for long periods of time, while the rest of my group were outside chatting and having a smoke.


I can relate to this sometimes, your sitting have a gab then everyone (wellmost of them) up and leave to go outside and have a ciggie and your left on your todd, or go out and join them which kind of defeats the purpose for passive smoking :confused:

Four smokers planning to kick the habit by 1 July
"I put up with it for a few weeks but in the end I decided to join them. Being an asthmatic, I had always been against smoking. I never used to let anyone smoke in my car or house. When someone smoked in my company in a pub, I couldn't wait until they had finished their cigarette. It was still something I had a real dislike of and a habit I considered to be disgusting.

"Now I'll regularly smoke up to 20 cigarettes on a night out. I still don't smoke when not out having a drink and I hope it stays that way. There's no doubt a lot of good has come from the smoking ban, it's a lot more pleasurable having a drink in a smoke-free atmosphere and I'm sure healthier for bar staff and non-smokers, but for myself it has come at a price."


Although I would still egg them on to give it a go, being a reformed smoker and all that, if they frequent the pub quite alot they won't do it, if they stay clear for a while they'll find it easier .

CHILDREN PASSIVE SMOKING
If you can't smoke at the pub and you don't want a fag standing outside, where are you going to light up? At home? The jury is still out as to whether the ban will result in children being expose to more passive smoking at home, but one study of the US suggests it could be the case.


Most of my friends have never smoked in front of their kids and I don't think the ban in Scotland the though didn't cross their mind, but then what do I know what goes on when I'm not there.


Beer and fags go hand in hand for many and a lot of heavy smokers are also heavy drinkers. In a bid to offset the possible impact on alcohol sales of punters being turned outside for a cigarette, many pubs are focusing on food. It's resulted in the demand for chefs going through the roof and their wages could follow.

I agree more people are turning to food in pubs as they can't smoke in the pub, especially when its pouring of rain outside, there munching instead of lighting up, which in turn causes people to put on weight. (maybe)


I think more people smoke in Cumbernauld than don't, It's disgusting everyone standing outside puffing away, it never bothered me in pubs people smoking, but always hated it in restaurants where food is being served. I can't see the ban lasting in England :roll:
User avatar
Sandra
Stone Cold Crazy
 
Posts: 2281
Joined: Fri Jun 30, 2006 2:00 am


Return to Esoteric Trivia

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests

cron